Comments on: Why sewing contractors don’t want small lots http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/ How to start a clothing line or run the one you have, better. Wed, 12 Aug 2015 13:47:49 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.4 By: jacqueline m http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/comment-page-1/#comment-183460 Sat, 17 May 2014 13:31:29 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=10095#comment-183460 thank you for wonderful posts
please let me know if you have any contractors for evening wear in the NY area

]]>
By: Dara http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/comment-page-1/#comment-64697 Wed, 04 Apr 2012 03:47:04 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=10095#comment-64697 Thank you, wonderful post!

]]>
By: Cheryl http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/comment-page-1/#comment-46240 Fri, 30 Sep 2011 18:14:05 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=10095#comment-46240 Hi Kathleen,
I love your site and your book. I make a living as a seamstress. Most of my jobs are alterations but I do custom work when people are willing to pay for it. You do not need to apologize for earning your living. You are a business, not a non-profit. I receive phone calls from potential customers. We chat about their project and I add about 40% to what I ‘think’ the labor cost will be. I have under-estimated enough times, I refuse to cheat myself again. The phone call often ends in silence from their end. They think a ‘custom’ job will cost the same as a department/bridal store item…..Umm..no… I refuse to donate my talent. I do charitable work for the local animal shelter. I am a business that needs to make a profit. If you feel strongly about helping small/new designers maybe you should choose how many hours you are willing to donate at the beginning of each year? That’s what I do for charity work. Pick a figure and that’s it…. If they want your ‘training’, they need to pay you for your time. If they cannot afford your time, that is not your problem. A business must make money or close their doors. It really is as simple as that.

]]>
By: Kate Rawlinson http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/comment-page-1/#comment-46238 Fri, 30 Sep 2011 17:44:51 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=10095#comment-46238 This is all very interesting, but what I don’t understand with the two examples of DEs you gave, is why you don’t charge them for the extra hours? I get the logic that it would take longer for you to return it to them and have them redo their part, but why not bill them for the extra work they’ve caused you? In the case of the DE who ruined the pattern, in an area you’ve written about extensively before, why not just say, look, you did this, here’s where I’ve pointed out this error a million times, and that’s why it’s taken me extra hours to correct.

Maybe I’m being really dim here, but it seems like the worst-case scenario is that they wouldn’t use you in future, but that doesn’t seem to be a great loss. I’m not being snippy here, I just genuinely don’t understand why you wouldn’t bill the clients for extra work if the fault lies with them. (I’ve worked extra hours for nothing in the past because I’ve taken on work and promised to do it within a certain timeframe, but in that scenario the fault – ie that I couldn’t get it done in the time I’d originally estimated – was mine. If they subsequently sent me a load more stuff to do within the same timeframe, I would charge more – which seems like the same equation to me, you’re being asked to do more work beyond what was initially agreed.)

]]>
By: Xochil http://fashion-incubator.com/why-sewing-contractors-dont-want-small-lots/comment-page-1/#comment-46235 Fri, 30 Sep 2011 17:05:45 +0000 http://www.fashion-incubator.com/?p=10095#comment-46235 I think contractors are very aware of not trying to rip off a customer, or appearing that they are, which is one of the reasons for minimums. Whether patterns or sewing, spending more time on a project where you are unable to bill for the extra time, such as a client who changes their design in the middle of the pattern process, or loses a pattern piece between fittings, or the contractor needs to stop a project because the zippers aren’t in, the buttons aren’t in, etc. Each time the client has to be called in to remedy the situation, the contractor loses that time, plus potential opportunity, which no one really thinks about. Thanks Kathleen for being so open on this topic.

]]>