This week in blog history 9

Again, I somehow let this series get away from me. For the newest visitors, in this series I highlight the posts made of the given week one year ago. It’s a way people can revisit and explore the depths of the site, finding things you didn’t know were in here. This entry will cover an entire month, that of last August 2005. Postings were light that month as I’d just gotten married and was in the process of moving from El Paso to Las Cruces. Before I get started though, here’s a picture I took this morning on my way back from class.

I don’t claim it has anything to do with fashion -to those who dislike my off topic posts- I just think it’s so funny and I know it’ll make me laugh every time I load the site. If this water isn’t portable -being hauled by a truck as it is- I don’t know what it is.

With Pattern Puzzles, I started a new series. This particular entry was about some pre-WW2 home sewing patterns from Germany (I love vintage patterns). I think it’s fun to see the shapes of pieces and figure out how they go together. People with spatial intelligence (assuredly the pattern makers in our midst) like these. Carol did a nice tutorial, printing and cutting out the pieces which you can see in the second entry. The third pattern puzzle entry of the month featured a photo of a full size pattern (link to full size download too) from Galliano, courtesy of ShowStudio.


The next entry was Marriage by Movable Type in which my betrothed and I exchanged our wedding vows via trackbacks on our blogs. Due to a quirk in Texas law, doing it this way was entirely legal, making us the first couple in history to get married over the internet. It seemed appropriate; we met over the internet.

A review of the book Why We Buy written by Paco Underhill, retail anthropologist. Since it’s one of the few books I link to in my sidebar, I obviously think it’s worth reading. I would make more money by linking to more expensive books so I think that should say something.

Alternatives in women’s sizing was another in my vanity sizing myth series. In this entry I proposed that women’s dresses and blouses should be sized like bras -on a cartographic scale as opposed to the drafting standard of an x-y coordinate to which we’ve all been trained and acclimated. Drafting on an x-y coordinate is a simplistic strategy birthed of measuring a fixed inanimate object which bears little relationship to the scale of people. In my never humble opinion.

Interfacing: 10 tips was surprisingly popular. I am continually amazed at the number of questions people have about interfacing. I’m disappointed that enthusiasts aren’t given better information regarding the appropriateness of usage.

Then follows one of the most popular posts ever published on this site (judging from stats) What is a line sheet? Then is Shopping industrial machines, followed by Tools and Supplies. From there we switch gears and discuss the top ten Retail buyer complaints (about manufacturers and designers) and follow up with the insider’s guide to the top 10 signs of a problem designer. I’d say the latter two are required reading.

In My dirty laundry, you’ll get an idea of what motivates me, why I do this site in the first place. In some ways, it could be considered my mission statement with a warning to use the term “sweatshop” fairly rather than as a pejorative to describe any sewing operation.

I don’t normally include every entry I wrote in the blog history posts but I’ll include Matisse the Master because it has a photo of some leather pillows I made in case you want to see what my stuff looks like.

The last entry of the month was Kewpie doll patent & pattern which was a submission from Meggiecat. On her friendly, neighborly blog, she collects and archives old sewing related patents which I find interesting.

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6 comments

  1. Camille C says:

    I think we got it Jean – that’s why the post is funny. Such an obvious “typo”. Even funnier because they had to stencil it. I’ve seen so many trucks with the correct warning. Makes me wonder who actually painted the letters. Hilarious.

  2. Sarah says:

    Kathleen, that picture is one of the funniest I’ve seen in a long time. I saw it last night after you posted it and have chuckled every time I’ve thought of it since. Thanks for sharing it – you made my day.

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