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CSPIA, books and libraries
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Dianne
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2009 9:38 am    Post subject: CSPIA, books and libraries Reply with quote

I stumbled on this post today about how the CSPIA is affecting those selling books. I don't know where to post this, so could someone please move this post where it should go. Thanks.

http://bookshopblog.com/2009/01/04/book-burning-on-feb-10th-2009-due-to-cpsia/
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Melanie
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 12:53 pm    Post subject: CSPIA, books and libraries Reply with quote

Just came across this article that quotes the associate executive director of the American Library Association...

http://thephoenix.com/Boston/News/74940-Congress-bans-kids-from-libraries/

she says...“We are very busy trying to come up with a way to make it not apply to libraries,” said Sheketoff. But unless she succeeds in lobbying Capitol Hill for an exemption, she believes libraries have two choices under the CPSIA: “Either they take all the children’s books off the shelves,” she says, “or they ban children from the library.”

the article came out Friday, Jan 9th
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blizzard77
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 13, 2009 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The latest CPSC response is not looking good. http://www.cpsc.gov/library/foia/advisory/323.pdf And as far as I can tell-- still unclear on what constitutes an "ordinary" book intended for kids under 12 and what constitutes an "ordinary" book intended for those Over and Under age 12.

Not to mention they reiterate the need for unit testing vs. component or supplier testing. And hinted at the expense that will be incurred by those who go through the process to apply for a formal exemption. If they won't accept data compiled by the well-connected American Publisher's Assoc. then what on earth will they accept?
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PostPosted: Sun Jan 18, 2009 12:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I asked at our local library in the last few days, and the librarian I talked to knew NOTHING about it. She was appalled, and wanted me to give her some info so she could google it!!!
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Robin B
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PostPosted: Mon Jan 19, 2009 11:29 pm    Post subject: Books, CPSIA and US Department of Education Reply with quote

Forgive me if this has already been asked... I searched but turned up no results here or through google.

If the Act covers books intended for children as we all know the definition to be, then why isn't the Department of Education all over this? We have entire school districts claiming bankruptcy and yet they are technically should have books tested or replaced in just a matter of days? Books through middle school should be included, as most 8th graders turn 13 in that year of education. That is a lot of children and a lot of books. Not to mention a LOT of money that frankly some schools don't have. Texas schools are already being strangled by <a>HB 1</a> Rolling Eyes yet another well thought out bill.

Hyperlink coding not working properly for me tonight. HB 1 article can be found here www.star-telegram.com/245/story/1148566.html
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Trace
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 8:44 am    Post subject: American Library Association links Reply with quote

More from the book/librabry industry... (since I've seen bits of this referenced here, but not the original source material that follows)

From the American Library Association:
"Under the CPSC's interpretation of the law, which seeks to protect children from exposure to lead and phthalate, books for children under the age of 12 are required to undergo the same testing procedures as children's toys. Since the General Counsel's opinion is retroactive, all books currently on library or store shelves must be removed for testing, including textbooks and children's literature books in academic library research collections."
http://www.wo.ala.org/districtdispatch/?p=1322

They also have a PDF file of the letter they sent to congress here:
http://www.wo.ala.org/districtdispatch/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/cpsia1.pdf

And a follow-up post on their website:
http://www.wo.ala.org/districtdispatch/?p=1349

No other information or updates seem to have been posted since.
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Robin B
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 20, 2009 2:44 pm    Post subject: Dept of Education for Texas... clueless? Reply with quote

I called the Texas Education Agency and the person in curriculm was clueless about the Act. Ms. Weller asked around before she gathered more information (links and such) to research the matter.
They can't be ignorant of the Act this far into the game... can they?

I sent her the links to the Act, amendments and the confirmation from Cheryl Falvey that books were included in an e-mail. I will post any reply I receive.
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Mark from Denver
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:20 pm    Post subject: Self-published children's books and post cards (and crayons) Reply with quote

I self-publish coloring books. They are very simple, 8.5" x 11" copy paper printed with black ink, at Fedex-Kinkos. They are "perfect bound" with paper tape (not plastic). They do not have fancy glossy covers, and are instead just colored copy paper (slightly heavier weight, like construction paper). I print about 100 copies at a time at Fedex-Kinkos, and then reprint them as needed. I am already assuming I need to have these tested for lead to meet the 2/10/09 CPSIA requirements, as part of assuring they do not exceed the minimum lead standards. To accomplish this, is testing with an XRF gun adequate?

Also, I self publish postcards with original cartoon characters, which have a slightly glossy, "aqueos" finish. Because it is mostly kids purchasing my postcards, I need to take responsibility to test them. In this case, I get them printed 2500 at a time from a post card printer. However the post card printing company doesn't focus on children's products, specifically. They just print anythng. As such, I feel I need to take responsibility for testing. Is testing for lead with XRF gun technology adequate for this as well.

Finally, I sometimes buy packs of Crayola brand crayons from Wal-Mart, to re-sell along with my coloring books, and I have several hundred packs in my inventory. Would I go back to Wal-Mart or Crayola to try and get GCCs or some other assurance that their crayons do not have lead? I shudder at this thought, as I'm just a 1-person company, and do not look forward to explaining how I purchase the crayons off Wal-Mart shelves, to re-sell them again.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks.
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Kathleen F.
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Joined: 08 Sep 2005
Posts: 11369
Location: NM Albuquerque

PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, you can use XRF testing, contact thesmartmama.com for more info. As a commodity, the crayons may be a problem.
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 27, 2009 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you for your reply Kathleen. I'll be arranging to have them tested using XRF testing. I have some homework to do for the Crayons.
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Candy
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:20 pm    Post subject: Newspapers? Reply with quote

I have a question that I haven't seen brought up anywhere else, but I could be wrong about that. Sorry if this is a duplicate thought.

Wouldn't the same parts of the law that are effecting the publishing industry, book sellers and libraries also be aimed toward any newspaper publication that is aimed toward children. Like the NIE - Newspapers in Education, Comics, special sections created for kids like activity guides, spelling bee lists.

I freelance for a small town paper (graphic arts) and tried to ask around there, but everyone is really clueless to this law. Hadn't heard of it and weren't interested. But I do know that even as a small town paper they run something aimed toward kids at least once or twice a week, and have several special sections aimed toward kids throughout the year.

BUT, I bet they'd be interested if they suddenly were on the wrong side of the law for printing a ton of media aimed at the 12 and under set. Many of the things the local paper creates for kids are bound by staples.

I was just curious because it seems like people suddenly get behind figuring out this mess when they realize it will effect their life. If this will actually impact newspapers, they might take more interest in it as well.
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Kathleen F.
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Joined: 08 Sep 2005
Posts: 11369
Location: NM Albuquerque

PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 2:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, the cartooning community is onto it. I think it was this woman who wrote about it before but I can't find it now. I hate LiveJournal, impossible to navigate. Anyway, cartoonists are caught in a similar bind as the BMX people because cartoons, like small wheeled bikes, are presumed to be for children. I don't have any direct contacts in that community so if someone develops inroads, it would be good.

Edited to add: I found this entry that mentions cartooning (scroll down).
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Candy
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PostPosted: Thu Jan 29, 2009 3:34 pm    Post subject: Newspapers? Reply with quote

Really interesting links, thank you!

I am curious though about the newspaper industry as a whole as well, not just the comics part of the industry. Because wouldn't the newspapers that create any product aimed for use of children be legally obligated to follow these laws as well?

For example, our local paper is just wrapping up a huge run for a large spelling bee book, there is a weekly Imagine page, just for kids. There is a whole month dedicated to Newspapers in Education, NIE where they bring newspapers into the classroom for projects.

The newspaper industry is strapped and failing. There is no room for expensive testing in their already failing budgets. If this does concern them, maybe they need to be told. It might get to be big news really fast.
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guest
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2009 12:52 pm    Post subject: two news stories on the library book kerfuffle Reply with quote

http://www.kcba.com/Global/story.asp?S=9737570
http://www.cnn.com/2009/US/01/30/lead.books/index.html
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happymom4
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PostPosted: Fri Jan 30, 2009 7:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I note that David A. is passing out erroneous info again, right? "I think" he says that not every individual title needs to be tested.

Umm, that would be SO nice, but what he THINKS isn't the law.

Too bad CNN didn't check what the law actually says before printing that.
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