FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister   ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

Children's Wear: Lead Issues
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fashion-Incubator User Forum Forum Index -> CPSIA & Consumer Safety
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Esther
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 1877
Location: ID Spudville

PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:17 pm    Post subject: Children's Wear: Lead Issues Reply with quote

The House just passed a ban on lead in children's toys and products creating the toughest lead standard in the world with severe penalties for non-compliance.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080730/ap_on_go_co/lead_in_toys

I am concerned about the reach of this law. Something to keep an eye on.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Suna
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What does it have to do with apparel?
Back to top
Jenn Ritz
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 5:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I am concerned about the reach of this law. Something to keep an eye on.


In terms of child safety, I'm hopeful that the law WILL apply to children's apparel. In my former product development job, I did a lot of work with testing labs for a line of children's toys. I was AMAZED at the high level of lead found in seemingly benign trims and fabrics. I had to test and retest revised prototypes made of new fabrics and trims (for storage bags and shoulder straps) to comply to the US toy standards. Even some zippers with plastic teeth were found to have a dangerously high level of lead! It was definitely an eye-opener for me!

Generally, when they pass a new law, they grandfather in toys that are already on the market, unless they are found to be truly and immediately dangerous (i.e. choke hazards). I wouldn't stress over having to recall any products that you've produced already, but a new law could affect the products you launch in the future.

If anybody needs help with ASTM testing for children's products, let me know. I have quite a bit of experience in that realm.
Back to top
Vesta
Inactive


Joined: 23 Dec 2005
Posts: 882

PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes! Lead is a concern in apparel. Many (most?) conventional standards allow 600 parts per million of lead to be present in the dyes and inks used in fabrics. As a point of comparison, organic fabric processing standards generally shoot for, um, you know, NO lead; but will allow TWO parts per million.

Especially for fabric and trim coming out of China, lead is a concern.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Esther
Moderator
Moderator


Joined: 17 Mar 2006
Posts: 1877
Location: ID Spudville

PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 7:48 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lead has been found in buttons, zippers, inks used in screen printing, other trims, metal components, and other items as Jenn Ritz has said. The law includes any items that a child MAY put in their mouth. The US already has the toughest lead guidelines (voluntary mostly). The law will change the guidelines to government regulations with stiff fines (and possible jail time) for non compliance.

It used to be Big Box retailers only required metal components be tested. This law will drastically alter how children's products are manufactured.

The actual testing requirements have yet to be determined but it may become a deterrent to new childrenswear designers. I imagine the cost of entry to the children's market will increase. I imagine the cost for testing will also increase (just because it will now be a government requirement). I don't know, maybe I am being overly concerned. And please don't interpret this to mean I am anti-child safety. The opposite is true. Still, I believe it is impossible to manufacture a 100% safe product and this is what this legislation is attempting.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
Lisa DOWNTOWN JOEY
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Esther...thanks for posting this.

I agree. The thing that worries me is this type of regulation and the costs involved with adhering to it will make children's clothing even more expensive than it already is.
Back to top
Lisa DOWNTOWN JOEY
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 1:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Looks like Talon already has the answer:
here

And YKK makes lead-free zippers.
Back to top
Anne
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 8:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ideal Fastener also makes lead-free zippers and zippers with safety features for children. They also have an eco line of recycled zippers! Most of their manufacturing facilities are abroad, though. I spoke with them this week and they are checking into what they have for small companies here in the U.S.
Back to top
Jenn Ritz
Guest





PostPosted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Anne, I would love to hear if Ideal Fasteners can supply a small startup. Please let us know when you hear back from them!
Back to top
Sewsneaky
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 08, 2008 11:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Please forgive my ignorance but what is it that lead does in regard to fabric? I understand it is used as a hardener on hard items such as plastics but don't understand the link between lead and fabric. Can anyone please enlighten me?
Back to top
Vesta
Inactive


Joined: 23 Dec 2005
Posts: 882

PostPosted: Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's not the fabric, it's the inks and paints in/on the fabric.

You can read about lead's role in paints here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_paint
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
amyruth
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 10:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So is there really lead content in polyester fleece? I buy most of mine from Joanne's and use it on my own kids as well as selling finished products on a custom order basis.
Back to top
Lisa DOWNTOWN JOEY
Guest





PostPosted: Mon Dec 15, 2008 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

guess this bib company is ahead of the curve. But they'll still need to test.
Back to top
ramona1166
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2008 9:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm educating myself on this issue so that I can talk to people about it intelligently. I've printed the actual bill and gone through it so that I can see where this law applies to products other than just toys and things intended for children's use.

I haven't been able to find where it applies to adult clothing. Can someone tell me how adult clothing manufacturers are affected?

Thanks to anyone who can clarify this for me.

The kicker on this is that even though the product DOES comply with the regulations, the testing for the certificate to prove it is prohibitive. It will put many people who produce safe products out of business simply because they don't have the money to pay for the certificate.
Back to top
Pamela
Guest





PostPosted: Wed Dec 17, 2008 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Ramona, that is exactly correct. The only thing is they aren't paying for the certificate per se but for the testing so the results can be put onto the certificate.

Pam
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Fashion-Incubator User Forum Forum Index -> CPSIA & Consumer Safety All times are GMT - 6 Hours
Goto page 1, 2, 3  Next
Page 1 of 3

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group