A cutter’s must

A direction or pattern card is an itemized list of all the pattern pieces that pertain to a particular style. While a direction/pattern card is not a cutter’s must, it can be used as one. Here is a photo of an actual card.

Like a direction card, a cutter’s must is an itemized listing of the pattern piece components of a given style. Regardless of whether you’re using direction cards (and I suggest you do), you must provide a cutter’s must to the cutting department or a contractor on an ordinary sheet of paper. Below is a sample of a common cutter’s must for style #21117.

Either of these two things serve the same purpose but a cutter’s must is made from the direction card. You can download and print out this sample cutter’s must here (666kb). You can find a sample form to use on page 79 in the Entrepreneur’s Guide.

You will notice that the cutter’s must is color coded. Now, I realize that many companies don’t color code their pieces but I suggest you do. Please color code your pattern inventory appropriately; it eliminates the potentiality of disaster -as you’ll see in tomorrow’s post.

Get New Posts by Email

10 comments

  1. Project Kaizen: Tuesday

    Today’s entry is making improvements for sub-team members performing the same type of work. In other words, I’ll be writing about troubleshooting in the pattern department. One of the clearest example of this is when I worked for an American…

  2. A cutter’s must pt 2

    In the first post of this series, I defined a cutter’s must, explained its utility and had posted a very basic cutter’s must for style 21117 so go back and review that posting if you have no idea what I’m…

  3. PN numbers

    This post is about PN numbers -another layer of complexity in pattern room management and I hope I can explain this well. PN stands for Pattern Number so when we say PN numbers -and we usually do- we’re being redundant….

  4. Carnival of Lean Leadership #4

    Welcome to the fourth Carnival of Lean Leadership. There’s a lot of material to cover this time, so we’ll get right to it… The highlight of the past week has been the blogfest on project kaizen by The Gang of

  5. A question of line size

    A reader asks (I forgot to ask if she wanted to be anonymous so I’m erring on the side of caution): In your book when you talk about line size, you mentioned that if you were doing purses you would…

  6. Jill says:

    It says: Regardless of whether you’re using direction cards (and I suggest you do), you must provide a cutter’s must to the cutting department or a contractor on an ordinary sheet of paper.

    Is *you* referring to the pattern maker or the designer?

  7. Kathleen says:

    Good question Jill, thank you.

    By “you”, I mean the person who is ultimately responsible -the designer- should see to it that the cutters have a cutter’s must, it’s part of the package of stuff you give them to produce an order.

    The cutter’s must (or pattern card) should be provided by whomever makes the pattern. It is not a complete pattern, the job is not done, without it.

  8. Jill Homiak says:

    I see. So the pattern & pattern card go on to the cutting station/person. The patternmaker makes the pattern card though, correct? But the designer makes sure its given to the cutting station?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *